Videos

Molecules , neurons and morality

Molecules , neurons and morality

Illusions , delusions and the brain

Illusions , delusions and the brain

3rd May - Reconceiving 'Natural Theology': Meaning, Sacrifice and God

Reconceiving 'Natural Theology': Meaning, Sacrifice and God

Prof. Diarmaid MacCulloch - Silence in Modern and Future Christianities

Lecture 6: Silence in Modern and Future Christianities

We consider the democratisation of the quest for silence in industrial society: the tangling of a secular society with the silences provided by Christian tradition, through for instance the popularity of retreats, or the observance of silence in remembrance. We see the importance of 'whistle-blowing' to modern Christianity, and its use of the historical discipline. We ponder the relation of agnosticism to silence; the role of music in silence and Christian understanding; the relationship between Word and Spirit in the future of Christian life.

1st May - Teleology Reviewed: A New 'Ethico-Teleological' Argument for God's Existence

Teleology Reviewed: A New 'Ethico-Teleological' Argument for God's Existence

In the fifth lecture of the Aberdeen Gifford Lecture Series 2012, Professor Sarah Coakley takes up the challenges left by the last two lectures, and now confronts the contentious and multi-levelled question about "teleology" in evolution.

1st May - Teleology Reviewed: A New 'Ethico-Teleological' Argument for God's Existence

Teleology Reviewed: A New 'Ethico-Teleological' Argument for God's Existence

Prof. Diarmaid MacCulloch - Getting Behind Noise in Christian History

Lecture 5: Getting Behind Noise in Christian History

So far, the story has largely been about overt history: the positive utterances and actions of public Christianity. We turn now to further and more complex varieties of silence: first the phenomenon of 'Nicodemism', simultaneously audible to those with ears to hear, and not to be heard by others.

Prof. Diarmaid MacCulloch - Silence Transformed: The Third Reformation 1500-1700

Lecture 4: Silence Transformed: The Third Reformation 1500-1700

The noisiness of Protestantism, particularly exacerbated by the end of monasticism, unsuccessfully countered in the Church of Zürich but transcended first among radical Reformers (especially Caspar Schwenckfeld and Sebastian Franck) and a century later by the Society of Friends. The difficulties of contemplatives in the Counter-Reformation, where activism was the characteristic of the new foundations of Jesuits and Ursulines, and the problems faced by such revivals as the Discalced Carmelites. The troubles of Madame Guyon and Quietists.

26th April - Ethics, Cooperation and the Gender Wars: Prospects for a New Asceticism

Ethics, Cooperation and the Gender Wars: Prospects for a New Asceticism

Prof. Diarmaid MacCulloch - Silence Through Schism and Two Reformations: 451-1500

Lecture 3: Silence Through Schism and Two Reformations: 451-1500

The significance of the threeway split in Christianity after the Council of Chalcedon (451). The purposeful Chalcedonian forgetting of Evagrius Ponticus and the contribution of an anonymous theologian who took the name Dionysius the Areopagite. The role of Augustine in the Western Church: a theologian of words, not silence. The transformation in the use of silence and its function after the Carolingian expansion of Benedictine monastic life (together with the West's discovery of pseudo-Dionysius), and the further development through the great years of Cluny Abbey.

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